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Clinical Gastroenterology Journal

Open Access

Editorial Note on Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Abstract

Nizaj Akbul

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), commonly referred to as heartburn, is a condition resulting from stomach acid moving backward from the stomach into the esophagus (the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach). The acid causes burning, inflammation and pain on the lining of the esophagus and can eventually lead to permanent damage of the lining. Tightness in the chest may also be felt, and sometimes heartburn can be confused with symptoms of a heart attack. This backward flow of acid is also called reflux when symptoms are brief and intermittent and do not cause on-going symptoms. Many people experience acid reflux from time to time. GERD is mild acid reflux that occurs at least twice a week, or moderate to severe acid reflux that occurs at least once a week. Most people can manage the discomfort of GERD with lifestyle changes and over-the-counter medications. But some people with GERD may need stronger medications or surgery to ease symptoms. The term “gastroesophageal” refers to the stomach and esophagus. Reflux means to flow back or return. Gastroesophageal reflux is when what’s in your stomach backs up into your esophagus. In normal digestion, your LES opens to allow food into your stomach. Then it closes to stop food and acidic stomach juices from flowing back into your esophagus.

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