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To identify the most common fencing injuries in variety of competitors
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Journal of Sports Medicine & Doping Studies

ISSN: 2161-0673

Open Access

To identify the most common fencing injuries in variety of competitors


2nd International Conference on Sports Medicine and Fitness

April 18-20, 2016 Dubai, UAE

Kirill Alekseyev

Kingsbrook Rehabilitation Institute, USA

Scientific Tracks Abstracts: J Sports Med Doping Stud

Abstract :

A brief survey was conducted at several Athletic Clubs in the Tri-State area to fencing athletes in order to identify the most common fencing injuries in the different levels of competitors which included Olympic Athletes. The different levels will include beginner, intermediate and advanced. Injuries from three different types of weapons used in fencing: foil, epee, and sabre was also evaluated. The ages of the athletes varied from minors to adults and was evaluted to whether their type of injury is consistent with their age. From 115 survey participant├ó┬?┬?s male to female ratio was 79 males and 36 females with an average age of 30.7 years old. Participant├ó┬?┬?s average years of experience were 11.6 with an average of 8.2 hours of training per week. The weapons of choice were Epee 101 followed by Foil 17 and by Sabre 4. Most participants considered themselves experts with 61, followed by intermediate 41 and by beginners 12. From the participants 97 have experienced pain as a result of injury vs. 18 who did not experience any pain or setbacks. Mild injuries suffered in decreasing order included: knee 21, wrist 15, ankle 14, elbow 13, foot 11, lower back 10, shoulder 10, neck 6, hip 2, hamstring 2 and heel 1. From the mild injuries 12 participants had 2 or more injuries, 7 participants had 3 or more injuries and 10 participants had 4 or more injuries. Moderate injuries suffered in decreasing order included: knee 25, ankle 18, foot 11, wrist 10, elbow 10, lower back 10, shoulder 9, hands 5, hip 4, neck 4 and hamstring 2. From the moderate injuries 13 participants had 2 or more injuries, 8 participants had 3 or more injuries, 3 participants had 4 or more injuries and 1 had 5 or more injuries. Severe injuries suffered in decreasing order included: knee 9, lower back 8, ankle 7, elbow 5, shoulder 5, foot 2, wrist 2, hip 2, hands 1, hamstring 1. From the severe injuries 5 participants had 2 or more injuries, 1 participant had 3 or more injuries and 3 participants had 4 or more injuries. From the participants 58-seeked treatment vs. 45 who did not. From the participants 51 had a reoccurrence of their injury.

Biography :

Kirill Alekseyev has completed his MBA from St. Joseph’s College after completing his undergraduate studies at Stony Brook University in Long Island, NY as a Division I student athlete. He then went on to pursue his MD at American University of Antigua. He is currently a 2nd year resident physician at Kingsbrook Rehabilitation Institute in Brooklyn, NY. He is the Vice President of the Resident’s Committee at NY Society of PM&R (largest PM&R Society in US) with an option to be president next year. He is also a Special Olympics Coordinator for the past 3 years. He has published chapter, articles in various journals, books and databases. He has over 20 poster and oral presentations at various national conferences. He is a recipient of NY Society of PM&R recognition award in 2014 and this year’s recipient of Professionalism award from his current Residency Program at Kingsbrook Rehabilitation Institute, Brooklyn. He was a runner up for Vice Chair position for residents at Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP) second largest PM&R national organization.

Email: Kirill.Alekseyev@gmail.com

Google Scholar citation report
Citations: 657

Journal of Sports Medicine & Doping Studies received 657 citations as per Google Scholar report

Journal of Sports Medicine & Doping Studies peer review process verified at publons

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