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Journal of Sports Medicine & Doping Studies

ISSN: 2161-0673

Open Access

Sports Therapy

All sports have a risk of injury. In general, the more contact in a sport, the greater the risk of a traumatic injury. However, most injuries in young athletes are due to overuse. Most frequent sports injuries are sprains (injuries to ligaments) strains (injuries to muscles), and stress fractures (injury to bone) caused when an abnormal stress is placed on tendons, joints, bones and muscle.

The most obvious anatomic difference between men and women that may lead to ACL injuries is a wider pelvis in women than men. This difference results in a wider "Q-angle," or quadriceps angle. This is the angle at which the femur (upper leg bone) meets the tibia (lower leg bone). It is thought that this increased angle places more stress on a woman's knee joint, which makes it less stable than a man's knee joint.

Anatomy of the Knee Joint

Women tend to have much smaller surface areas in the knee joint, including the two rounded ends of the thigh bone called the femoral condyles. The space between these condyles, the femoral notch, is the space in which the ACL connects the femur to the tibia. Some researchers speculate that the small space of a women's femoral notch may be more likely to cause impingement of the ligament and ultimately result in an ACL tear.

Special Issue on Sports Medicine and Exercise physiology

Keeping all these instances into consideration, Journal of Sports Medicine and Doping Studies Invites paper submission for our special issue based on “sports medicine and Exercise physiology” and “sports management” from quality authors till 30th of September 2015. All these articles would be published in October issue of our Journal.

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