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Journal of Sports Medicine & Doping Studies

ISSN: 2161-0673

Open Access

Sports Medicine Blogs

Injury Prevention in Soccer and Other Contact Sports

Soccer has a higher injury rate than many contact sports, including rugby, basketball and football. Many of the injuries occur with players younger than age 15.

Reports say that young female players tend to suffer more knee-related injuries, while male soccer players are more likely to report more ankle injuries. Sport Medicine professionals investigating these injuries conclude that many of these injuries could be prevented if athletes participated in exercise programs designed to strengthen muscles that are at higher risk of being injured. A Reuters news story reports that studies also have shown that female soccer athletes playing on synthetic turf tend to have less severe and total injuries than those who play on natural grass.

Research also demonstrates a higher incidence of female soccer players experiencing concussions than male athletes. However, Sport medicine professionals believe that many female soccer athletes who collide with another player or are hit with a soccer ball and fall to the ground may not realize they could have a concussion. Frequently, they do not feel any symptoms associated with a head injury, such as headaches and dizziness, which often occur several hours later.

Keeping all these instances into consideration, Journal of Sports Medicine and Doping Studies Invites paper submission for our special issue based on “sports medicine and Exercise physiology” and “sports management” from quality authors till 30th of September 2015. All these articles would be published in October issue of our Journal.

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