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Editorial Note on Environmental Bio Prospecting Development
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Journal of Biodiversity & Endangered Species

ISSN: 2332-2543

Open Access

Editorial - (2022) Volume 10, Issue 1

Editorial Note on Environmental Bio Prospecting Development

Haiying Cui*
*Correspondence: Haiying Cui, Department of Environmental Science, Northeast Normal University, China, Email:
Department of Environmental Science, Northeast Normal University, China

Received: 10-Jan-2022, Manuscript No. bej-22-53093; Editor assigned: 12-Jan-2022, Pre QC No. P-53093; Reviewed: 15-Jan-2022, QC No. Q-53093; Revised: 20-Jan-2022, Manuscript No. R-22-53093; Published: 25-Jan-2022 , DOI: 10.37421/2332-2543.22.10.404
Citation: Cui, Haiying. â??Editorial Note on Environmental Bio Prospecting Development.â? J Biodivers Endanger Species 10 (2022): 404. DOI: 10.37421/2332-2543.22.10.404
Copyright: @copy 2022 Cui H. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Editorial

Environmental issues and efforts to safeguard the country's natural heritage must be viewed in the perspective of Costa Rica's historical growth route since 1940. A stable political system based on a disarmed democratic administration, high economic development rates, and significant progress in social indices characterise this time. Costa Rica is ranked first in the world by the United Nations Development Program's Human Development Index (0.71). Aspects of the country's development summarises the indicators. Surprisingly, despite having a low GDP per capita, with a per capita income of less than $4,028, the country has achieved, among other things, life expectancy. Indicators of life expectancy, health, and literacy are comparable to those found in many developed countries.

The examination of biodiversity for commercially useful genetic resources and biochemicals is known as biodiversity prospecting, or bioprospecting. It refers to the search for resources as well as the gathering of resources with the goal of commercialising them. Plants, animals, and all living species, including bacteria and fungi, are all affected. Bioprospecting can also entail gathering traditional knowledge from local populations about how to utilise these resources. The purpose of a resource-related action decides whether it is called bioprospecting or not. It is included in the definition of bioprospecting if the goal is to make money from the resource by keeping, breeding, cultivating, trading, and using it for the development and production of drugs, food flavours, fragrances, cosmetics, colours, extracts, other biochemical compounds, new plant varieties, and products. If keystone species are destroyed or local extinctions are induced by overharvesting of the resource, bioprospecting may have a severe detrimental influence on the environment. The National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, Act 10 of 2004, and its accompanying Bioprospecting, Access, and Benefit Sharing Regulations were promulgated in 2008 to ensure that bioprospecting is done in a sustainable manner.

Bioprospecting is a term used to describe operations carried out by a small number of business sectors in order to create new innovative medications. As a result, and because bioprospecting often entails obtaining small samples of material, the environmental impact is usually minor. However, it is critical to guarantee that bioprospecting is carried out in a sustainable and ethical manner, with equitable rewards for the country and individuals who benefit from the genetic resources. The International Convention on Biological Diversity, to which South Africa is a signatory, has set this as a major goal. We are a key factor in bioprospecting since South Africa is rich in biodiversity and traditional knowledge, as well as having well-developed scientific capabilities and institutions. Users must also guarantee that they fairly share advantages with knowledge holders and others who provide biological resources. While these advancements are unquestionably an improvement over the prior lack of control over bioprospecting, it is vital to remember that bioprospecting provides only limited monetary or non-monetary benefits. Biopiracy occurs when biodiversity or information about biodiversity is obtained without authorization from the owners of these resources – and then patented. Environmental offences are subject to harsh penalties under the Biodiversity Act and the BABS Regulations. For those found guilty, the penalties may be R 5 million, 5 years in prison, or both

Environmental issues and efforts to safeguard the country's natural heritage must be viewed in the perspective of Costa Rica's historical growth route since 1940. A stable political system based on a disarmed democratic administration, high economic development rates, and significant progress in social indices characterise this time. Costa Rica is ranked first in the world by the United Nations Development Program's Human Development Index (0.71). Table 1 summarises some of the country's evolution indicators. Surprisingly, despite having a low GNP per capita of less than US$ 4,028, the country has achieved life expectancy, health, and literacy levels comparable to many industrialised countries in the north [1-5].

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