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Virology: Current Research

ISSN: 2736-657X

Open Access

Volume 5, Issue 3 (2021)

Research Article Pages: 1 - 4

Early and Late Complications after Abdominal Surgery in Patients with COVID-19 in Armenia

Karine Aloyan* Hayk Harutyunyan and Arayik Voskanyan

Importance: A little known on early and late outcomes of abdominal surgery in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Objective: To describe early and late complications after abdominal surgery in patients with COVID-19. Design, setting, and participants: A prospective cohort study is conducted at Astghik Medical Center, Yerevan, Armenia, from February 1 until October 31, 2020. The study population comprised 259 patients with COVID-19 and 245 patients without COVID-19 matched by operation type, age, sex, and comorbidities, underwent abdominal surgery. Differences between early (1-30 postoperative days) and late (31-60 postoperative days) complications in both groups were analyzed. Exposures: Patients with COVID-19 had been diagnosed based on both clinical and laboratory (RT-PCR, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay in nasopharyngeal swabs) criteria at least 14 days before abdominal surgery. Patients without COVID-19 were not screened at time of surgery, but were free from any respiratory symptoms and had negative RT-PCR results during preoperative 14 days. Main outcomes and measures: The primary endpoints were early and late postoperative complications. Secondary endpoints were to determine 60-day surgical mortality and the impact of comorbidities as additional risk factor of postoperative complications in patients with COVID-19. Results: A total of 29 patients with COVID-19 developed early or late postoperative complications. Only 4 patients without COVID-19 with early postoperative complications were identified. The median age of patients with COVID-19 who had early and late postoperative complications were 54.5 (range: 45-64) and 69.5 (range: 65-74), correspondingly. At least one comorbidity was present in 25 (86.2%) of 29 patients with COVID-19 who developed early or late postoperative complications. A 60-day surgical mortality was 14.3%. Conclusion and Relevance: COVID-19 is associated with high risk for postoperative complications of abdominal surgery even if surgical procedures are performed after 14 days of COVID-19 onset. Only patients aged 45 to 74 years developed complications in our study. Presence of at least one comorbidity was an additional risk factor of postoperative complications. Larger and better designed studies are needed to find out indicators for early detection of postoperative complications in patients with COVID-19, especially in people older than 45 years and in those with comorbidities.

Editorial Pages: 1 - 1

COVID-19: A Global Pandemic

Joydeb Majumder

While Covid sickness 2019 (COVID-19) isn't the primary pandemic of the 21st century, it has produced phenomenal worldwide concern and reactions. COVID-19, brought about by serious intense respiratory disorder Covid 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is thought to have risen up out of a zoonotic source and spread quickly in people through respiratory drops and contact. There is some worry for airborne transmission, yet the part of this transmission course outside the potential aerosolizing methodology in medical services settings is hazy. With an expected regenerative number, R nothing (R0), of somewhere in the range of 1.4 and 5.6, SARS-CoV-2 quickly spread around the world. Since the primary cases revealed in December 2019, there have been more than 106 million affirmed cases and 2.3 million passing’s detailed around the world (starting at 9 February 2021).

Editorial Pages: 1 - 1

Immunoglobulin Reactions on Covid-19

Tanu Singhal

While Covid sickness 2019 (COVID-19) isn't the primary pandemic of the 21st century, it has produced phenomenal worldwide concern and reactions. COVID-19, brought about by serious intense respiratory disorder Covid 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is thought to have risen up out of a zoonotic source and spread quickly in people through respiratory drops and contact. There is some worry for airborne transmission, yet the part of this transmission course outside the potential aerosolizing methodology in medical services settings is hazy. With an expected regenerative number, R nothing (R0), of somewhere in the range of 1.4 and 5.6, SARS-CoV-2 quickly spread around the world. Since the primary cases revealed in December 2019, there have been more than 106 million affirmed cases and 2.3 million passing’s detailed around the world (starting at 9 February 2021).

Short Communication Pages: 1 - 1

SARS CoV-2 Viral Mutations

Neda Shaghaghi

The concern rose even more last week when Anthony Fauci, MD, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), broached the idea during an online chat. A mutation that speeds up COVID19's spread might explain why the virus known as SARS-CoV-2 has so rapidly moved through North America and Europe, where the G614 mutated version is predominant [1]. The original version of the virus, D614, was most widely seen in China and other parts of Asia.

Short Communication Pages: 1 - 1

COVID-19 pathophysiology

Koichi Yuki

It was soon exposed that a novel coronavirus was responsible. The novel coronavirus was named as the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2, 2019-nCoV) due to its high homology (~80%) to SARS-CoV, which caused acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and high mortality during 2002–2003 [1]. The disease produced by this virus was called Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) and a pandemic was declared by the World Health Organization (WHO).

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